Recent additions to our collection

Hot pies! Cold drinks! Lovely new resources!

Nothing ignites a librarian’s interest like a padded envelope stuffed with new materials for our collection. Seriously, nothing.  Note to self: get out more.

Below is a curated list of the latest and greatest resources for you. There’s YouTube, there are books, there are journal articles.  Remember, if you are interested in borrowing anything you can, in fact, we encourage you to.  Of course, you’ll need to be a member, which you can find out more about here. For the cost of a cafe meal or two, you can get a whole year’s worth of brain food.  So very worthwhile!

YouTube: Love, Loss and Laughter – Living with Dementia, Fire Films Australia

A filmmaker’s devotion to her grandmother, who has been living with dementia for 15 years, has been the inspiration behind a film that shares the story of the international photographic exhibition, Love, Loss and Laughter: Seeing Dementia Differently.

Corinne Maunder, Producer, Fire Films Australia, said the Love, Loss and Laughter exhibition presented an ideal opportunity to create a meaningful piece about dementia. As an entry in the inaugural Reel Health International Health Short Film Festival, the film explores the messages behind the photos that comprised a six month tour in Australia.

“While making the film I learnt that even though dementia is a condition that people live with, it doesn’t mean a person should be isolated from the everyday activities that they can still enjoy in so many ways.

“The project made me appreciate even more, the time that I have with my grandmother and my mother and aunt’s unswerving dedication as carers,” Ms Maunder said.

American sociologist and social photographer, Cathy Greenblat took the photographs in the United States, France, India, Japan, the Dominican Republic, Canada, Monaco and more recently, in Australia. The exhibition has already touched the hearts of thousands of people as it has travelled throughout the America, Asia and Europe. A book of the same title was published in 2012.

Teen fiction book: Back to Blackbrick, Sarah Moore Fitzgerald

BackBlackbrickPitched at late primary school kids and early secondary students.  This is a well-written, insightful and modern story of a young care-giver’s struggles to accept the many changes and responsibilities being forced upon him and still connect with the grandfather he knows and loves. It elegantly identifies and articulates the multi-layered strands of grief and loss and day-to-day coping that families experiencing dementia know all too well.

‘The ghosts in your life don’t ever really go away. Every so often they will whisper to you, and they will brush past you and maybe you will even feel their misty sweet breath on your skin. It’s fine. Don’t worry about it too much.’

Lost memories, lost times, lost lives – a stunning new debut novel. Cosmo’s brother Brian died when he was ten years old. His mum hides her grief by working all the hours God sends and Cosmo lives with his grandparents. They’ve been carefree days as Granddad buys him a horse called John and teaches him all he knows about horses. But the good times have to come to an end and although he doesn’t want to admit it, Cosmo knows his Granddad is losing his mind. So on one of the rare occasions when Granddad seems to recognise him, Cosmo is bemused that he gives him a key to Blackbrick Abbey and urges him to go there. Cosmo shrugs it off, but gradually Blackbrick draws him in . . . Cosmo arrives there, scared and lonely, and is dropped off at the crumbling gates of a huge house. As he goes in, the gates close, and when he turns to look, they’re rusty and padlocked as if they haven’t been opened in years. Cosmo finds himself face to face with his grandfather as a young man, and questions begin to form in his mind: can Cosmo change the course of his family’s future?

Fiction: Green Vanilla Tea, Marie Williams

green vanilla tea

This story describes the impact of dementia on the whole family but in a positive light. It outlines the ways in which the boys find the personhood of their father amongst the diagnosis. The man who was their father is not lost. It also touches on the profound and ongoing impact living with someone with dementia and motor neurone disease has on a family. This is a story of human connection, of love and of grace.

When Marie Williams’ husband Dominic started buying banana Paddle Pops by the boxful it was out of character for a man who was fit and health conscious. Dominic, Marie and their two sons had migrated to Australia to have a life where they shared more family time — when gradually Dominic’s behaviour became more and more unpredictable. It took nearly four years before there was a diagnosis of early onset dementia coupled with motor neurone disease. Marie began to write, as she says, as a refuge from the chaos and as a way to make sense of her changing world. Her book, Green Vanilla Tea, has just been named winner of the 2013 Finch Memoir Prize.

Families and Carers: Living with Dementia: A Practical Guide for families and personal carers, edited by Esther Chang and Amanda Johnson

living with dfementiaLiving with Dementia: A practical guide for families and personal carers provides a sensitive, direct and highly accessible account of the complexities and challenges that a diagnosis of dementia presents. Written by aged care experts, including academics, nurses, medical practitioners and family advocates, Living with Dementia offers evidence-based research, supported by clear chapter outcomes, key terms and real-world vignettes. Practical strategies are integrated throughout to support caregivers, paid and unpaid, in the home environment and in residential care settings.

The book offers advice on how to manage everyday activities such as feeding, toileting, personal hygiene and grooming, and coping with challenging behaviour. In recognising the needs of the whole person, mental stimulation and spirituality are also addressed. An introduction to commonly used medications, complementary therapies and effective communication strategies are provided, as well as information about caring for the dying, and most importantly, looking after you – the carer.

Whether you are an Assistant in Nursing, an Enrolled Nurse, a family member or a friend caring for a loved one, Living with Dementia will assist you to move beyond the negative perceptions, and enable a meaningful life for the person with dementia, within the limitations of the disease.

Fiction: Angela and the Cherry Tree, Raphaele Frier and Teresa Lima

angela_and_the_cherry_tree_webThis lovely picture book can be enjoyed by all ages.  Don’t be deceived into thinking it’s only for kids, the lyrical story has aspects that can be explored and understood in different ways depending on your age and personal experience.  This is a story that I would happily read with my four year old and he would think it was a lovely tale about a grandmother and her (imaginary) grandchild.  I would interpret it as an attempt to imagine and explain what it might be like to experience dementia. Whatever your take on the story is, its gorgeous, heart-warming with beautiful illustrations.

“Angela wakes up full of hope. She is expecting a visitor. She prepares her hair, puts on perfume and bakes her speciality, shortbread cookies. She waits, impatiently at times, and finally the little girl arrives.

Angela and the Cherry Tree provides a touching insight into the mind of a person suffering from dementia. It is a rare and poignant picture book, handling a sensitive subject with respect and dignity. Its insights and beauty are derived from perceptive, lyrical detail and stunning illustrations.”

DVD: You’re looking at me like I live here but I don’t, Scott Kirschenbaum

you are looking at me_webPersonally, I greatly enjoyed this unique, warts-and-all but incredibly respectful and dignified film about Lee Gorewitz, a person with dementia. Lee is an engaging, entertaining and likeable protagonist who effortlessly brings you into her world and you leave the richer for the time you have spent there with her.

This film may be confronting for some, with it’s clear-sightedness on the realities of day-to-day living with dementia, however as an example of person-centred thinking, Scott Kirschenbaum manages to capture and convey Lee’s essential personality above and beyond her diagnosis of dementia.

“In Danville, California, Lee Gorewitz wanders on a personal odyssey through her Alzheimer’s & Dementia care unit. From the moment she wakes up, Lee is on a quest – for reminders of her past, and her identity. A total immersion into the fragmented day-to-day experience of mental illness, YOU’RE LOOKING AT ME LIKE I LIVE HERE AND I DON’T is filled with charismatic vitality and penetrating ruminations that challenge our preconceptions of illness and aging. Here is one extraordinary woman who will not let us forget her, even as she struggles to remember herself.”

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