Still Alice

still alice movieIn January 2015 a film version of the book Still Alice by Lisa Genova was released. This film has received critical acclaim and to date, has won multiple awards.

If you’ve read Still Alice or seen the film you already know that it is a story of a psychology professor Alice Howland (played by Julianne Moore) who is diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s disease. The story describes her life from early warning signs, through diagnosis and then follows her progress through the onset of symptoms. It eloquently illustrates the impact of Alzheimer’s disease for Alice and for her family.

This post includes articles prompted by the release of the film Still Alice—reviews, commentaries and a podcast. It is not an exhaustive list, but rather a small sampler of the discussions initiated by Still Alice’s cinematic interpretation.

Remember, we have copies of the novel version of Still Alice in the Alzheimer’s Australia VIC library. Here’s a link to a review of the book on this blog – scroll down a bit, the review of Still Alice is lower on the page. You can contact us or come and visit us if you’d like to borrow a copy.

Once the film is released on DVD you will also be able to borrow a copy of the film from our library.

Article: Still Alice is ‘shockingly accurate’ – people living with dementia give their verdict, Tom Seymour, 11 February 2015, The Guardian

Julianne Moore is an Oscar favourite for her portrayal of a woman with dementia in Still Alice. But what do people with the condition think of the film?

megaphonePodcast: A review of the film Still Alice, panel discussion by Alzheimer’s Australia Dementia Research Foundation, Episode 25.

On January 29, Still Alice was released in Australian cinemas, a movie based on fictional character Alice Howland from her dementia diagnosis through to onset of symptoms. Throughout the movie Alice slowly but inevitably loses memory and connection with reality. She gradually loses the ability to follow a conversational thread, the story line of a book, or to recall information she heard just moments before. All common dementia symptoms. Many film critics are raving about Julianne Moore’s portrayal of Alice, and she has already won a Golden Globe award for best actress and is number 1 pick to win a prestigious Oscar. So what do others think of the movie, particularly those who are close to the cause and is the movie sending the right messages about ‘what is dementia?’ While the overall view of the movie is positive, some critics do say the film is overly “pristine” and “shies away from taking risks”, while also not being plausibly representative of the typical experience of dementia in choosing to focus on an “almost perfect … privileged family.” Others ask if it focuses enough on the latter stages, along with the impact placed on families and carers. In this special extended episode of the Dementia News I am pleased to have joining with me, three expert panellists, Dr Siobhan O’Dwyer (Griffith University), Dr Andrew Watt (Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health) and Jill Brown (Alzheimer’s Australia ACT), to give their views of the movie and discuss just how close to real life it is.

Article: ‘Hollywood’ movie sparks dementia conversation, DPS News

It is expected that a new Hollywood movie, starring a lineup of well known actors, will lead to greater awareness of the ‘enormous’ dementia challenge facing Australia, particularly those experiencing younger onset dementia.

the conversationArticle: Still Alice, and the advocacy for Alzheimer’s in fiction, Matthew Wade, 29 January 2015, The Conversation

Still Alice – starring Julianne Moore – tells the story of Alice Howland, a linguistics professor diagnosed with a form of early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease. Moore has already netted a Golden Globe and is clear favourite for a well-deserved Best Actress Oscar next month.

The novel on which the film is based is one of a clutch of debuts in recent years to explore forms of neurodegenerative disease. So what role does fiction play in our understanding, and acceptance, of dementia?…

 

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