Richard Taylor – Collected works

Richard Taylor, a psychologist and person with younger onset dementia was a persuasive and passionate advocate for living well with dementia. Richard generously shared his personal experience of dementia in a range of ways – books, articles, presentations and DVDs. On July 25, 2015 Richard passed away.

Richard was a founding member of Dementia Alliance International. Another founding member of Dementia Alliance International, friend of Richard Taylor and Australian dementia advocate, Kate Swaffer, has written a beautiful and moving tribute to Richard.

Our post today focuses on Richard’s body of work – one that does not shy away from how our community can and must be more dementia-friendly and view people with dementia as just that—whole and real people.

alzheimers_from_the_inside_out_webBook: Alzheimer’s from the inside out by Richard Taylor, 2007

Thoughtful and self-reflective, this collection of illuminating essays offers a rare glimpse into the world of individuals living with Alzheimer’s disease. Diagnosed at age 58, psychologist Richard Taylor shares a provocative and courageous account of his slow transformation and deterioration, and of the growing divide between his reality and the reality of others.

With poignant clarity, candor; and humor, Taylor addresses the complexity and emotions surrounding issues such as the loss of independence and personhood, unwanted personality shifts, the struggle to communicate, changing relationships with loved ones and friends, continuous declines in ability to perform familiar tasks, and never-ending uncertainty about the future.

Article: Waiting for Godot, while living with a diagnosis of dementia, probably of the Alzheimer’s type, Richard P. Taylor, Activities Directors’ Quarterly, Vol. 9, no. 1 Winter 2008 p. 14-16

“Yesterday someone asked me if I could/would write my own care plan. A plan of care that I believe would meet my needs today! Of course I first googled “plan of care Alzheimer’s” to discover the elements common to plan of care for someone in the early stages of the disease…”

Note: should you be interested in this article please request it through our handy form.

live outside the stigma DVD_webDVD: Live outside the stigma by Richard Taylor, 2011

These are the thoughts I so wish I had access to just after I was diagnosed. It took lots of living to work out and work through these conclusions concerning the myths and stigmas that automatically come with the words “Richard you have Dementia, probably of this or that type.”  These are the words I wish someone far wiser and more experienced than I had spoken to me shortly after I was diagnosed. — Richard Taylor

Article: Measuring “the rubs” of my quality of life, Richard Taylor, Alzheimer’s Care Today, Vol.8, Issue 4, October-December 2007 p. 292-293

“How happy am I? What is the quality of my life? High or low, good or bad, poor or rich? Am I, Can I ever be really happy?…”

Note: should you be interested in this article please request it through our handy form.

be_with_me_today_webDVD: “Be with me today.” A challenge to the Alzheimer’s outsider by Richard Taylor, 2009

Richard Taylor was diagnosed with dementia, probably of the Alzheimer’s type, when he was 58 years old. Now 66, Richard speaks to the public about living with the disease and sends out a challenge to the Alzheimer’s outsider. This is the first DVD in a series of Richard’s “TODAYs.” Join Richard as he speaks from his heart, urging all of us to recognize that “THERE IS A PERSON IN THERE.” It is a remarkable documentation of his presentation to aging services professionals, urging them to embrace the culture change philosophy of person-centered care. For anyone who knows, interacts with, works with, or provides services to people with dementia.

Article: Who actually cares about respite care? People who attend it the most – and are consulted the least, Richard Taylor, Activities Directors’ Quarterly, Vol. 8, no. 3 Summer 2007 p. 27-28

“Three cheers for each and every person who works hard in his or her country, state, and community for funding of respite care! It provides a necessary and useful pause for caregivers.

Now, what about the person who uses the service? What about the quality of the service?…”

Note: should you be interested in this article please request it through our handy form.

100answers20questions6pers_webDVD: 20 questions 100 answers 6 perspectives hosted by journalist Julie Anderson, this program features Judy Berry, Mona Johnson, G. Allen Power, MD, Richard Taylor, PhD, Sarah Rowan, PhD, and Bill Thomas, MD, 2012.

The topics include:

•Maintaining a respect for the personhood of each person
•Ways to help persons with dementia to continue to live purposefully
•Recognizing differences in forms of dementia
•Medications and behavioral concerns
•End-of-life care
Everyone will be informed, encouraged, and challenged by these well-rounded insights.

Hosted by journalist Julie Anderson, this program features Judy Berry, Mona Johnson, G. Allen Power, MD, Richard Taylor, PhD, Sarah Rowan, PhD, and Bill Thomas, MD.

Here is a list of questions:

1.What is dementia?
2.Are all dementia the same?
3.What is Alzheimer’s disease then?
4.How do care partners approach a person with dementia in relation to types of dementia?
5.We have heard these words; caregiver and care partner. What do they mean?
6.How should a doctor tell you about a diagnosis, especially a terminal diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and other related dementia?
7.What is the best way for a physician to present a diagnosis?
8.How would you like the diagnosis relayed to you as a patient or as family member?
9.What role should you take in planning treatment?
10.What criteria would families/professionals use to decide which drug to use?
11.Is there a need for someone with dementia to enroll in clinical trial?
12.Why do people resist accepting a diagnosis?
13.What is the importance for accepting dementia diagnosis?
14.Common phrase, “Alzheimer’s is the long goodbye.” “People with Alzheimer’s disease are fading away.” Is this a stigma? Are people with dementia really fading away?
15.How can someone living with dementia have a sense of purpose?
16.When dementia strikes in the family, what are some of the topics to discuss about dementia diagnosis at the family dinner table?
17.What about hope?
18.How can care partners understand what its like to live with the symptoms of dementia?
19.what are best practices for care partners, professionals and people with dementia?
20.In the life of a person with dementia today what is the role of reminiscing?
21.How can care partners minimize stress?
22.In reality, when should a person with dementia move to assisted living community?
23.It is a human moral responsibility to look out for your neighbor; to have each other’s back. In this context, how should society, governments and families understand and respond to dementia?
We believe that this video is both informative and helpful to you in answering some of the questions you might have. Remember, the answers from each individual in this video are personal opinions.  The video is designed to give you information from various points of view so you can make informed decision as per your situation. Keep in mind that if you have met one person with dementia, you have only met one person with dementia.

living w dementia R Taylor DVD_webDVD: Living with dementia: To change your mind about people whose minds have changed by Richard Taylor & G. Allen Power, 2011

In the first of three parts, Dr. Power makes the case for a paradigm shift needed in the established model of institutional long-term care. Viewers see documented evidence of the negative outcomes that result from traditional care, including the dangerous practice of “medicating away” the predictably negative reactions that emerge in response to standard care practices and attitudes. In describing a new vision of care, Dr. Power describes how to

 

  • Redefine the disease to better understand those experiencing it
  • Stop making people with dementia look and act like we do
  • Recast “problem behaviors” as mechanisms for coping and communicating
  • Find new ways to make normal life experiences accessible to people with dementia
  • Create more opportunities for people to feel connected and find meaning day to day
  • Decrease suffering and increase satisfaction using a new “experiential” model of dementia care

In part two, Dr. Taylor, a former psychologist and educator, articulates the needs, fears, and all-too-common negative experiences of a person diagnosed with dementia. He speaks from the heart on behalf of all those who are unable to communicate for themselves and, at the same time, speaks as one unique individual asking to be respected, supported and, most of all, seen and heard. With surprising candor and wit, he presents moving personal stories and sage advice that provide new insight about the experience of the disease to formal and informal caregivers as well as LTC managers and administrators.

Together, in part three, these two inspiring speakers respond to common questions and concerns, including

  • How to communicate a person’s preferences to care staff
  • Whether asking for opinions and responses from people with dementia is confusing for them
  • Ways to have better long-distance interchanges with a loved one by phone
  • Whether better care practices can be taught or are essentially innate
  • And much more

This valuable training tool helps to raise the awareness of anyone working in long-term care settings to the remaining potential for people with dementia to lead satisfying and fulfilling lives — with appropriate supports — despite their losses.

* G Allen Power is the author of      “Dementia beyond drugs : changing the culture of care” and he discusses parts of his book as well as referring to Tom Kitwood and the Eden principle

2 thoughts on “Richard Taylor – Collected works

  1. Thanks for the email. I have quickly glanced through the publications and my initial impression is that a number are of immediate interest. My wife and one afflicted with this disease was not quite as enthusiastic so I will have to proceed cautiously and with sensitivity.

    • Hi Peter
      We are glad this post is of interest, if you decide you would like to see any of these resources do let us know. We would be delighted to help you. Of course, many of Richard’s writings can also be accessed by his website which is referenced in the post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s