Music and dementia

musicanddementia_mast_ver2

 Music plays an important part in society, both past and present. Response to music is universal and it does not diminish with dementia. This post looks at  sustaining meaning and connection through music.

 

Music remembers me : connection and wellbeing in dementia  /  Kirsty Beilharz  (2017)music remembers me

Music remembers me includes moving stories from music engagement along with practical advice and tips about introducing music into daily care. Author Kirsty Beilharz has woven together fascinating insights into music, our brains and dementia with practical advice on music engagement.

 

 

Forever today : a memoir of love and amnesia  /  Wearing, Deborah  (2005)forever today

Clive Wearing is one of the most extreme cases of amnesia ever known. In 1985, a virus completely destroyed a part of his brain essential for memory, leaving him in a limbo of the constant present. An accomplished conductor and BBC music producer, Clive was at the height of his success when the illness struck. As damaged as Clive was, the musical part of his brain seemed unaffected.

 

DVD : Glen Campbell…I’ll Be Me  (2014) I'll be me_glencampbell

In 2011, music legend Glen Campbell set out on an unprecedented tour across America. He thought it would last 5 weeks; instead it went for 151 spectacular sold out shows over a triumphant year and a half. What made this tour extraordinary was that Glen had recently been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. He was told to hang up his guitar and prepare for the inevitable. Instead, Glen and his wife went public with his diagnosis and announced that he and his family would set out on a ‘Goodbye Tour.’ The film documents this extraordinary journey as he and his family attempt to navigate the wildly unpredictable nature of Glen’s progressing disease using love, laughter and music as their medicine of choice.

DVD: Alive inside: A story of music & memory. A film by Michael Rossato-Bennett, 2014Alive Inside DVD

Alive Inside is a joyous cinematic exploration of music’s capacity to reawaken our souls and uncover the deepest parts of our humanity. Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles the astonishing experiences of individuals around the country who have been revitalized and awakened by the simple act of listening to the music of their youth.

You can view the trailer for this wonderful film below:

 

 DVD: Twilight songs  /  Producer and story researcher Nicky Ruscoe  (2014)

Twilight Songs follows music practitioner Michael Mildren as he visits patients in aged care homes in Melbourne. By playing music for them on a variety of instruments, and singing songs from their past, he achieves a remarkable connection, one that helps bring them into the present and improves their quality of life. Michael has been doing this work for 20 years and is devoted to making the lives of the elderly more interesting and enjoyable through the power of music.
ABC Compass

articles_finalLove is listening  / Helen Scott  (2017)

Virtuoso percussionist Dame Evelyn Glennie used her listening skills to make meaningful connections with care home residents with dementia. Helen Scott explains how the Love is Listening project worked.
The Journal of Dementia Care Vol 25 No 5 September/October 2017 p.14-15

Young dementia: together in perfect harmony (2017)

Singing in harmony creates togetherness and belonging among people with young onset dementia. Claire Watts and Sabrina Findlay report.
The Journal of Dementia Care Vol 25 No 5 September/October 2017 p.20-21

Music therapy: positive results, changes that last (2017)

Ming Hung Hsu explains how music therapy can help care professionals respond better to the needs of people with dementia, reducing distressing symptoms and improving quality of care.
The Journal of Dementia Care Vol 25 No 5 September/October 2017 p. 28-29

 

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