Let’s eat – nutrition and dementia

Let's Eat blog

We have to eat; we like to eat; eating makes us feel good.
Ensuring someone with dementia can maintain their enjoyment,  nutritional intake and independence at mealtimes can be complex. This month we look at some resources to assist.

 

helpsheets-aaAlzheimer’s Australia Helpsheets

Read online or download and print the comprehensive information for maintaining enjoyable eating and nutrition.

Eating          Nutrition 

 

 

bestpracticefoodandnutritionmanualBest Practice Food and Nutrition Manual for Aged Care.- 2nd edition (2015)

Section one of the manual includes information
relevant to residents’ nutritional needs and menu
planning guidelines. Included is a menu checklist
and tips on maximising the nutritional content of
the menu items.
Section two addresses the social aspects of
dining by providing ideas to enhance mealtime
atmosphere and mealtime enjoyment.

Download manual

eating-and-drinking-well-supporting-people-living-with-dementia-1-638Eating and Drinking Well: Supporting People Living with Dementia (2017) -training workbook and video

 These training tools are designed to equip frontline nurses and care home staff with the skills needed to improve the delivery of nutrition and hydration for people living with dementia.

 Watch the film                Download the workbook

 

BOOKS

its all about the food         Don't give me eggs that bounce_mm     food and nutrition for people with dementia  practical nutrition

 

  • It’s all about the food not the fork!  /  Morgan-Jones, Peter ,  Greedy, Lisa ,  Ellis, Prudence  &  McIntosh, Danielle  (2016)
    Imagine… you’re not comfortable with cutlery, can’t face a large meal, have reduced appetite, trouble with chewing or swallowing, are always on the move or have other things on your mind—an easy to eat, handheld snack that is high in energy, nutrition and taste will restore dignity and enjoyment to your dining experience. While everyone who loves a snack will enjoy It’s all about the food not the fork, it is a gift of love especially prepared for older people and people with dementia, swallowing difficulties or other disability, as well as carers.
  • Don’t give me eggs that bounce : 118 cracking recipes for people with Alzheimer’s  /  Peter Morgan-Jones, Emily Colombage, Danielle McIntosh, Prudence Ellis.  (2014)
    Australia’s leading aged care chef, Peter Morgan-Jones, has prepared innovative recipes which draw on his extensive international experience, with one recipe even inspired by cooking for a ‘young prince’ at Highgrove House.
  • Food and nutrition for people with dementia  /  Dementia Services Development Centre, University of Stirling  (2009)
    This guide for care workers is designed to raise awareness of the eating and drinking difficulties faced by people with dementia. It provides details of problems likely to be encountered on a daily basis and outlines practical ways to overcome them.
    It shows that, in many cases, a few simple measures – from gaining knowledge of a person’s likes and dislikes and dietary requirements, to making mealtimes and enjoyable experience, can ensure access to good food and drink.
    The guide offers tips to care workers on helping someone with dementia to eat – from how to stay calm and flexible to involving them in meal and snack times – and advises how to maintain the individuality of those receiving care with dignity, respect, empathy and patience.
  • Practical Nutrition and Hydration for Dementia Friendly Mealtimes  /  Lee Martin  (2017)
    In this accessible guide, Lee Martin offers simple, practical and cost-effective solutions to ensure healthy and enjoyable eating for people with dementia. Presenting clinical advice in everyday language, this is the perfect book for unpaid carers and healthcare professionals alike.

 

JOURNAL ARTICLES

Note: should you be interested in any of these articles please request through our handy form.
articles_final

How to manage dysphagia (2017) in Australian Journal of Dementia Care Vol 6 (4) p.21-25
Strategies for carers to support safe swallowing and help people with dementia and dysphagia maintain the pleasures of tasting and eating

Redesigning texture modified foods (2017)  in Australian Journal of Dementia Care Vol 6 (4) p 26-27
LHI Retirement Services in South Australia has improved the mealtime experience for residents with dysphagia by changing the way texture-modified food is presented.
Read Online

 

Engaging mealtimes: a chef’s perspective   (2017) in The Journal of Dementia Care  Jan/Feb  p 18-19
The author discusses suggestions for stimulating the appetite of those with a diminishing interest in food.

 

Food for thought: Facilitating independence with finger foods (2013) in  The Australian Journal of Dementia Care Vol 2(2) p 19-20
Dietician Denise Burbidge discusses finger foods as a flexible, dignified meal option for people with moderate to severe dementia
Read online

 

Residents happy to help themselves (2013)  in The Australian Journal of Dementia Care Vol 2(2) p 21
The introduction of ‘help-yourself’ finger food and a person-centred dining approach has proved a successful addition to daily life at three Scalabrini Village aged care facilities in Sydney and Griffith which support people with dementia.
Rocco Andreacchio and Lauren Kingsbury explain how residents, care staff and families have benefited from the changes.
Read online

 

‘The meals look lovely but mum says the food is tasteless’ (2013) in The Australian Journal of Dementia Care Vol 2(2) p 15-18
Kim Wylie and Monica Nebauer explain how the loss of a person’s sense of taste and/or smell can contribute to under-nutrition in older people and those living with dementia.