The Montessori approach for people with dementia

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For those inspired by the recent presentation and workshops of Dr Cameron Camp at the The 17th Alzheimer’s Australia Biennial National Dementia Conference  or simply if you want to find out more about the use of the Montessori method for engagement with people with dementia read on.

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Video – Purposeful Activities for Dementia

Purposeful activities for dementia complements other professional development resources about engaging people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, including the downloadable Relate Motivate Appreciate toolkitPurposeful activities for dementia was developed  for families and aged care staff.

This resource has been created for anyone interested in providing people with dementia a range of interesting, encouraging and enriching activities: aged care staff, family carers, activity support workers, personal care attendants in residential and community settings, and people with dementia who want a resource to advocate for purposeful activities. Visit web page

The video is divided into six chapters. Each chapter addresses key messages and provides points for reflection. You can watch the entire video, or each individual chapter below.


Recent evaluation of Montessori approaches

 

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Assessment of capabilities in persons with advanced stage of dementia: Validation of The Montessori Assessment System (MAS)
Jérôme Erkes, Cameron J Camp, Stéphane Raffard, Marie-ChristineGély-Nargeot and, Sophie Bayard in Dementia  First Published September 21, 2017

This study evaluated the validity and reliability of the Montessori Assessment System. The Montessori Assessment System assesses preserved abilities in persons with moderate to severe dementia. In this respect, this instrument provides crucial information for the development of effective person-centered care plans. A total of 196 persons with a diagnosis of dementia in the moderate to severe stages of dementia were recruited in 10 long-term care facilities in France. All participants completed the Montessori Assessment System, the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale and/or the Mini Mental State Examination and the Severe Impairment Battery-short form. The internal consistency and temporal stability of the Montessori Assessment System were high. Additionally, good construct and divergent validity were demonstrated. Factor analysis showed a one-factor structure. The Montessori Assessment System demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties while being a useful instrument to assess capabilities in persons with advanced stages of dementia and hence to develop person-centered plans of care.   Abstract

 

Montessori-based activities among persons with late-stage dementia: Evaluation of mental and behavioral health outcomes
Scott E Wilks, P August Boyd, Samantha M Bates, Daphne S Cain, Jennifer R Geiger in Dementia  First Published April 27, 2017

Literature regarding Montessori-based activities with older adults with dementia is fairly common with early stages of dementia. Conversely, research on said activities with individuals experiencing late-stage dementia is limited because of logistical difficulties in sampling and data collection. Given the need to understand risks and benefits of treatments for individuals with late-stage dementia, specifically regarding their mental and behavioral health, this study sought to evaluate the effects of a Montessori-based activity program implemented in a long-term care facility.  Abstract

 

Implementing Montessori Methods for Dementia: A Scoping Review
Sander L Hitzig,  Christine L Sheppard in  The Gerontologist, Volume 57, Issue 5, 1 October 2017, Pages e94–e114,

A  review was conducted to develop an understanding of Montessori-based programing (MBP) approaches used in dementia care and to identify optimal ways to implement these programs across various settings. Abstract

 

Effects of Sustained, Coordinated Activities Programming in Long-Term Care: The Memory in Rhythm® Program
Iva De Witt-Hoblit, Mary Neal Miller, Cameron J. Camp,  in  Advances in Aging Research, Vol.5 No.1, 2016

 An account of  the creation and pilot testing of a sustained, coordinated activities program, Memory in Rhythm®(MIR), which incorporated Montessori-Based Dementia Programming™, in a skilled nursing facility (SNF). Effects of implementing MIR then were examined in memory care units in 16 aged care centers—9 SNFs and 7 assisted living residences in Ohio. For these centers, all data were collected over a period of one year before and one year after implementation of MIR. Results indicate that implementation of MIR was associated with reductions in medication use, increased census, decreased employee turnover, decreased wandering and agitation, and increased sleeping at night, eating and capacity for activities of daily living. Read online

 

Implementing Montessori Methods for Dementia™ in Ontario long-term care homes: Recreation staff and multidisciplinary consultants’ perceptions of policy and practice issues
Kate Ducak, Margaret DentonGail Elliot in Dementia First Published January 8, 2016

Montessori-based activities use a person-centred approach to benefit persons living with dementia by increasing their participation in, and enjoyment of, daily life. This study investigated recreation staff and multidisciplinary consultants’ perceptions of factors that affected implementing Montessori Methods for Dementia™ in long-term care homes in Ontario, Canada. Qualitative data were obtained during semi-structured telephone interviews with 17 participants who worked in these homes. A political economy of aging perspective guided thematic data analysis. Barriers such as insufficient funding and negative attitudes towards activities reinforced a task-oriented biomedical model of care. Various forms of support and understanding helped put Montessori Methods for Dementia™ into practice as a person-centred care program, thus reportedly improving the quality of life of residents living with dementia, staff and family members. These results demonstrate that when Montessori Methods for Dementia™ approaches are learned and understood by staff they can be used as practical interventions for long-term care residents living with dementia. Abstract